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Drama Club directs a community service play

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Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind is an audience-interactive production composed of many short plays written and performed by Drama Club as their community service play.
Director Jacqueline Laybourn, who is also the club’s vice president, dedicated her time to this production – from choosing the plays, cast, lighting, show dates, and everything in between.
Laybourn admits to being more in her element when helping others perform their best rather than taking the stage, and directing is something she hopes to pursue as a career.
“As director, it is important to remember that some things are just out of your control. You always have to look at things from an alternative perspective.”
One of her many cherished memories is the tendency for rehearsals to start later than anticipated due to the cast joking around, which led to a great deal of their inside jokes.
“We truly are the most meme-worthy club on campus,” she says.
Elijah Gallow, actor in a number of the short plays, also appreciated the inside jokes the cast and crew had together.
“My favorite memory is probably the first time another actor, Danielle Cordima, said, ‘Shut up Elijah!’ which was one of the many lines supporting a string of jokes throughout the plays.”
This play was especially important to him because of the service aspect.
“I like being a part of something that helps others,” Gallow says.
However, Gallow’s favorite part was performing in front of a live audience, which took time and practice. He believes a cast must dedicate themselves and allow themselves to look foolish in order to be effective, something they focused on during rehearsals.
Actor Adam Sproul enjoys the opportunity Drama Club provides to express creativity and have fun.
“Overall, the production was about fun for me. It boiled down to finding the funny bits in every little action and interpretation on stage, something that was entertaining for me to do alongside such talented cast members.”
He appreciates the coordination of the cast, a great community of ideas and comedic exploration, with the most important aspect consisting of imaginative freedom they have as actors to unify their unique ideas.
“My favorite memory has to be the day we spent a fair part of three hours revising the jokes in the script with little unique touches that made it all the more hilarious for the audience to witness and for us to perform,” Sproul reminisces.
Performed for only two days, both shows were independent from each other as the audience chose which order the skits would be performed.
Despite their significant rehearsal time, Gallow believes the performances differed so greatly that they were not always prepared.
“In the actual play, the audience was in control, so we had no idea what was next. They changed the dynamics of the show.”
He exemplifies this experience through their second and last night, where one involved audience member “professed” his love for Gallow, causing the play to be cut short – but all that mattered was the audience’s enjoyment.
Gallow feels it was easy to keep the audience engaged when the actors all felt they had creative control, and actress Danielle Cordima feels the same.
Because the production was student-run, Cordima feels the cast was given the opportunity to freely express themselves.
“We had a lot of freedoms, which was good and bad. Playing a character is easier, in my opinion, because as an actor you can develop the character’s background and mannerisms – their unique qualities,” says Cordima. “Sometimes it’s hard to channel my personality and bring it onstage. It makes me feel vulnerable because I’m not hiding behind a character.”
She admits her love for doing productions in the drama family because they are so close-knit and supportive, and Laybourn couldn’t agree more.
“I feel incredibly proud to watch 10 of my best friends utilize a talent they might not get to display in a regular day. I’m honored to have created that environment for them and see them thrive.”

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Drama Club directs a community service play